Question: How Is DKIM Verified?

It works by adding a digital signature to the headers of an email message.

That signature can be validated against a public cryptographic key in the organization’s Domain Name System (DNS) records.

When an inbound mail server receives an incoming email, it looks up the sender’s public DKIM key in DNS.

What is DKIM verification?

DKIM (Domain Keys Identified Mail) is an email authentication technique that allows the receiver to check that an email was indeed send and authorized by the owner of that domain. This is done by giving the email a digital signature. DMARC and DMARC Analyzer use both SPF and DKIM.

Do you sign emails with DomainKeys DKIM?

DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) allows senders to associate a domain name with an email message, thus vouching for its authenticity. A sender creates the DKIM by “signing” the email with a digital signature. When the MTA generates the signature, the public key used to generate it is stored at the listed domain.

How do I find my DKIM selector?

There is no way to detect if DKIM is implemented by the sender without getting a mail from the sender, extracting the selector from the DKIM-Signature header and getting the DKIM policy from DNS based on this selector. One can check if some commonly used selectors can be found in DNS.

What is the difference between SPF and DKIM?

In a nutshell, the difference between SPF and DKIM is simple: SPF uses path-based authentication while DKIM uses an identity-based authentication. SPF uses DNS to publish a record of all mail transfer authorities (MTA) authorized to send mail on behalf of the domain. A domain has a public/private keypair.